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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 m part 8


Optiant Going to a (Much) Better Place: Logility - Part 1
The mergers and acquisition (M@A) market seems to be coming back slowly. One evidence of this could be the late-March acquisition of long-struggling

m part 8  independent competitors such as  Mercia (now part of Infor )  and  Demantra (now part of Oracle Value Chain Planning ) . Another best-kept secret in the market is that Logility has possibly the most complete SCM functional footprint. Namely, its fully integrated Voyager solution optimizes supply chain processes from forecasting to supply planning and global sourcing and production to final delivery (execution). Part 2 of this series will analyze current Logility’s offerings for companies of all

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Software Test Tools

Tools exist to support software testing at all stages of a project. Some vendors offer an integrated suite that will support testing and development throughout a project's life, from gathering requirements to supporting the live system. Some vendors concentrate on a single part of that life cycle. The software test tools knowledge base provides functional criteria you might expect from a testing tool, the infrastructure that supports the tool, and an idea of the market position of the vendor.  

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Documents related to » m part 8

“Act Vertical” vs. “Go Extinct” Retailers - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series set the historical background for the supply chain management (SCM) evolution and presented the advantages and shortcomings of vertical vs. horizontal integration. The analysis then moved onto the generally embattled retail sector, where a select group of innovative retailers has found a “happy medium” approach to stay well above the fray. Retailers such as PetSmart Inc.

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Progress Software Revs Up to Higher RPM via Savvion - Part 1


Late 2009 and early 2010 were characterized by a number of mergers and acquisitions (M@As) in the vibrant and buoyant business process management (BPM) space. The merger of Progress Software Corp. (NASDAQ: PRGS) and Savvion Inc. drew my attention in particular. Why? Because, to my mind, Progress has thus made a large leap into the BPM space, a market where it has been

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Vendors Jostle and Profess Economic Stimulus Readiness - Part II


Part I of this blog series tried to analyze not only the opportunity but also the many related strings attached stemming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), a.k.a. the Economic Stimulus Plan. The inspiration came from my attendance of the Deltek Insight 2009 user conference last May, where Deltek decided to fill a market need by convening a separate

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UNIT4: The (Largely) Untold Story - Part 1


February and bleak mid-winters are not exactly the high season for software user conferences in North America, and thus I accepted the invitation by UNIT4 (formerly Unit 4 Agresso), the second-largest business applications provider in continental Europe, to its UK 2010 user conference. The attraction, in addition to the Celtic Manor Resort in lush South

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Consona’s CEO Clearing the Air (about Compiere) - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series talked about Consona Corporation’s recent acquisition of leading open source and cloud computing enterprise resource planning (ERP) provider Compiere. After reading a slew of speculative blog posts (including the one from TEC’s free and open source [FOSS] buff and advocate Josh Chalifour), I had an incisive briefing with Consona’s CEO Jeff Tognoni, to

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The Intelligence of Social Media (Part 2)


In the first part of this blog, I mentioned that sentiment analysis measures the polarity of opinion—positive, negative, or neutral—regarding a subject, a product, a service, etc. Two main approaches can be used to perform sentiment analysis or text mining: a knowledge-based approach, which uses linguistic models to classify sentiments; and a learning-based approach, which uses

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Can We Intelligently Use Part Numbers to Configure and Order the Right Products?


In the industrial automation industry, an overlooked, fatal flaw of sales configurator solutions is their inability to simultaneously configure part numbers and products. A greater concern is their inability to "decipher" product specifications from part numbers—that is, in reverse.

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Compiere ERP Becomes Part of Consona


In the enterprise open source space, a notable change came to light today affecting Compiere users and partners. Consona announced its acquisition of Compiere. Compiere started back in 1999. One of its founders explained to me that the company's business (circa 2004) largely came from support, migration, and priority requests from clients. An integral component of the delivery model was

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8 Questions to Ask to Successfully Negotiate a Phone System Deal


Learn how to get the right phone system for your company's requirements in 8 Questions to Ask to Successfully Negotiate a Phone System Deal.

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The (NA)Vision of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 - Part 3


Part 1 and Part 2 of this blog series went through the five previous generations of the Microsoft Dynamics NAV (formerly Navision) product. In late 2008, at the European Microsoft Convergence user conference, attendees saw the sixth major release of the product, dubbed Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009. The product’s subsequent launch in the US was in February 2009 (the replay can be seen here). But

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