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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 b part 6


Supplier Logistics Management (SLM) Part 2
Supplier Logistics Management (SLM) offers the opportunity for considerable improvement in efficiency as well as cost reductions. SLM enables companies and

b part 6  senior management the silver bullet they are looking for to minimize operational inefficiencies, reduce costs and gain a sustainable competitive advantage. This is Part Two of three-part note. Part One covered how Technology Enables Supplier Logistics Management. Parts Two and Three cover the Seven Fundamental Issues Targeted by Supplier Logistics Management. (1) Kraft In Sync with Shaw's Supermarkets' Consumer Goods Technology, Ralph Bernstein, June 2001 (2) Unexplainable Losses' Traffic World, John

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Software Test Tools

Tools exist to support software testing at all stages of a project. Some vendors offer an integrated suite that will support testing and development throughout a project's life, from gathering requirements to supporting the live system. Some vendors concentrate on a single part of that life cycle. The software test tools knowledge base provides functional criteria you might expect from a testing tool, the infrastructure that supports the tool, and an idea of the market position of the vendor.  

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Documents related to » b part 6

Managing Your Supply Chain Using Microsoft Axapta: A Book Excerpt Part Three: Common Scenarios


The nature of a sales and operations planning (S&OP) game plan depends on several factors, such as the need to anticipate demand, the item's primary source of supply, and the production strategy for manufactured items. Consideration of these factors can be illustrated with several common scenarios.

b part 6  domestic customers while Company B sells it the foreign customers. Sales forecasts for the equipment are defined for each company and site. This concludes Part Three of a four-part excerpt from the book Managing Your Supply Chain Using Microsoft Axapta by Dr. Scott Hamilton. The book can be ordered on amazon.com. Part One began the discussion of Sales and Operations Planning . Part Two detailed Understanding Planning Calculations. Part Four will propose Guidelines and Case Studies. Reprinted with Read More

Intentia Braces For Its Ongoing Roller-Coaster Ride Part 1


Intentia remains solid, with a broad product portfolio footprint and a slight increase in revenue, despite vacillating financial results. The company still needs to do a much better marketing job to achieve stronger global brand recognition well beyond its esoteric industries/geographies stronghold pockets, as one would expect from a company with such an offering.

b part 6  Braces For Its Ongoing Roller-Coaster Ride Part 1 Intentia Braces For Its Ongoing Roller-Coaster Ride P.J. Jakovljevic - July 15, 2002 Event Summary On June 12, Intentia International AB (XSSE: INT B), a Swedish provider of enterprise business applications for mid-size and large enterprises, vehemently denied certain erroneous information in media about its Q1 2002 cash flow situation. In issue no.23, the Swedish publication Affrsvrlden published an article that compared, in terms of liquidity, Read More

Not Yet Sold on SaaS ERP in Manufacturing? Take a Hard Look at Plex Online - Part 3


Part 1 of this blog series explained Plex Systems’ ebullience and growth despite a hostile and depressed environment, especially in the discrete manufacturing sector. While the software as a service (SaaS) model is now mainstream in many functional areas of business, the article concurred with Frank Scavo’s recent assertion that, for the time being, there is only one true SaaS enterprise resource

b part 6  a new industry would be a challenge (for the lack of dedicated product managers, see Part 1 ), would that also be the case with localization requirements? MS & PF : Plex Online is a solution that is easily configurable to meet localization requirements to accommodate different tax laws, regulations and languages. The language support is completely database-driven. New languages can be added very rapidly. Plex Online offers full support of double-bytes languages such as Chinese and Japanese. To understand Read More

The Magic Behind Planning and Executing (Optimal) Service Supply Chains - Part 2


Part 1 of this series established that service supply chains have many planning levels and time horizons, which can be roughly divided into the following: the immediate period around the day of service, and forecasting and planning for the day of service. My post then expanded on the various approaches to tame the challenges on the actual day of service. The most advanced

b part 6  to assign to Job B given everything else in the schedule and not just the prior job. Travel time must be part of the scheduling decision and considered concurrently with all other scheduling criteria. There is a key distinction between “true SLR” and various kinds of “pseudo-SLR” tools, especially the kind where the SLR is done only after the routes are computed using “as the crow flies” travel times, and the SLR results are then used to fix each individual route This caveat is described in Read More

The (NA)Vision of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series went through the first three generations of the Microsoft Dynamics NAV product, which at the time was called Navision and was owned by the formerly independent namesake company. How has new parent Microsoft treated the product since acquiring it in 2002? Well, ongoing feedback from customers, partners, and market observers shows that Microsoft Dynamics NAV

b part 6  environment here  using a Web browser), and without having to install it on your computer. The final part of this blog series will analyze how this product release might have mitigated the many traditional flaws of Microsoft Dynamics NAV (and former Navision) while building upon its traditional (if not proverbial by now) positive traits. In the meantime, your views and comments are welcome as usual. If you are existing users of Dynamics NAV or its former Navision incarnations, what have been your Read More

Grape Escape 2013: Customer Value a Priority for Both SYSPRO and UNIT4-Part 2


This is part 2 of a 2-part blog post on Grape Escape 2013, with my analyst take on the announcements and conversations with UNIT4 at the recent analyst event in Boston. UNIT4 Representing UNIT4 at the event were two top managers: regular attendee Ton Dobbe, the company’s vice president of product marketing, and Anwen Robinson, managing director in UK and Ireland, who was invited to share

b part 6  Value a Priority for Both SYSPRO and UNIT4-Part 2 This is part 2 of a 2-part blog post on Grape Escape 2013, with my analyst take on the announcements and conversations with UNIT4 at the recent analyst event in Boston. UNIT4 Representing UNIT4 at the event were two top managers: regular attendee Ton Dobbe, the company’s vice president of product marketing, and Anwen Robinson, managing director in UK and Ireland, who was invited to share some of UNIT4’s news in that region with analysts. Similarly to Read More

Taking Stock of TAKE Supply Chain Solutions - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series introduced TAKE Supply Chain, a supply chain management (SCM) division of TAKE Solutions, Ltd. The TAKE Solutions parent company is a global technology solutions and service provider, with significant focus across two principal business areas – life sciences and SCM, with an almost even breakdown of revenues between these divisions (the company is

b part 6  label printing solutions (to be explained in Part 3) to offer WMS lite solutions (such as inventory LPNs) and by partnering with Foxfire, based on customer needs. The key difference is that Gemini maintains real-time inventory accuracy through a real-time connection to ERP, where Foxfire WMS requires integration to the ERP data. Thus, not a large percentage of TAKE Supply Chain’s customers use the full set of WMS capabilities. For its part, transportation management is provided only through services Read More

The Lexicon of CRM - Part 2: From J to Q


C.R.M. itself is an acronym, standing for Customer Relationship Management. This is part two of a three-part article to provide explanation and meaning for most of the common CRM phraseology. Here, in alphabetical order, we continue the Lexicon of CRM.

b part 6  (see definition of WIP bins, in Part 3 of this series). This concludes Part 2 of the series. Part 3 covers the Lexicon of CRM from R to Z. Read More

UNIT4: The (Largely) Untold Story - Part 2


Part 1 of this series started with my invitation by UNIT4 (formerly Unit 4 Agresso), the second-largest business applications provider in continental Europe, to attend its UK 2010 user conference. Frankly, I was a bit skeptical about what new and exciting I might see and hear about at this event in light of the vendor’s analyst tour in Boston in late 2009. My post then

b part 6  my attendance of UNIT4’s Boston tour and the UK user event helped me at least allay any initial doubts about CODA’s future and UNIT4’s commitment that I might have had (as mentioned in Part 1 ). In hindsight, my initial knee-jerk assessment was way off the mark. UNIT4’s on-premise CODA Financials business continues to provide excellent customer service, while new product updates are being delivered regularly, and the product has a highly professional and experienced team. In fact, not only does Read More

Frankie Does ERP, Part 3


[Editor’s note: Frank is a real person, employed at a real company. However, I’ve changed certain identifying particulars for a variety of reasons. This interactive series is an exercise in what-if analysis based on ongoing interviews with Frankie as well as your feedback. You may find Frank’s use of language a little colorful. I have toned it down. It’s still colorful.] Previously

b part 6  exercise in what-if analysis based on ongoing interviews with Frankie as well as your feedback. You may find Frank’s use of language a little colorful. I have toned it down. It’s still colorful.] Previously: Episode 1 | Episode 2 * My boss wants an ERP system. My boss wants an SAP ERP system. My boss wants me to call SAP now so we can get this ERP system. He’s got it in his head that SAP is the Rolls-Royce of ERP, and that’s why he wants it. And because my paycheck is the only one currently Read More

SaaSy Discussions (Part Ia)


Part I of this blog post introduced the common software deployment models and Consona CRM's approach in that regard. To the end of enabling Total Customer Management (TCM) via an adaptive CRM offering, Consona CRM is built with a superior core infrastructure (customer data model, BPM, BI, SOA) and a holistic, best-of-breed product portfolio. Consona claims to be one of the market’s rare CRM

b part 6  sets based on configurable business rules, with an unlimited structure and multi-user/team assignment possibility. Platform enhancements make future upgrades easier and provide greater extensibility. The SQL Generation capability is a new data access architecture that is data-driven, which at runtime performs parameter substitution to construct SQL statements. All SQL (structural query language) procedures require no SQL coding, while there is referential integrity throughout the database. A seamless Read More

Is Epicor Poised to Rule the Mid-Market Retail Sector? (Part II)


Part I of this blog topic  introduced Epicor Software and its traditional vertical solutions. It also analyzed Epicor's forays into the attractive retail sector via the CRS acquisition two years ago. Designed for integration and scalability, the  Epicor/CRS Retail Suite can support a wide variety of retail enterprises' requirements. These environments range from the rapidly expanding regional

b part 6  the acquisition of NSB by Epicor for approximately US$320 million. NSB provides a range of software and hardware solutions to apparel, specialty, and department store retailers (which all sounds quite similar to the CRS' offering). As a vendor of software for retailers of apparel, footwear and other specialty merchandise, NSB is headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and registered and publicly traded in the UK. In 2007, NSB had over 600 employees and projected revenues of $91 million (with some Read More

Frankie Does ERP, Part 1


[Editor’s note: Frank is not a composite character. He is a real person, employed at a real company. I’ve changed certain identifying particulars at his request. This interactive series, created and published with his permission, is an exercise in what-if analysis based on interviews I am currently conducting with him. You may find Frank’s use of language a little colorful. I have toned

b part 6  interactive series, created and published with his permission, is an exercise in what-if analysis based on interviews I am currently conducting with him. You may find Frank’s use of language a little colorful. I have toned it down. It's still colorful.] * My name is Frank. I’m a mid-level manager for a manufacturer of scrotchets here in Greenfields, US of A. I have four direct reports, all of whom want my boss’s job after they’ve digested and shat mine out. Thanks to the latest round of Read More

Can We Intelligently Use Part Numbers to Configure and Order the Right Products?


In the industrial automation industry, an overlooked, fatal flaw of sales configurator solutions is their inability to simultaneously configure part numbers and products. A greater concern is their inability to "decipher" product specifications from part numbers—that is, in reverse.

b part 6  hypothetical situation: the letter B could denote 480 volts, H could denote 208 volts, and DA could denote120/220 volts. Likewise, the number 5 could stand for 5 horsepower, the number 10 for 10 horsepower, and so on. Similarly, 10A might denote 10 amperes, and 20A , 20 amperes. For colors, blue (the default, let's say) might not require a code, but R could signify red, and G could signify green . Thus, if somebody wanted a blue 480-volt, 5-horsepower, 10-ampere contactor, the person would fax in an Read More