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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 assessment guide for business crm software


5-step CRM Software Selection Guide: A Pragmatist’s Guide to CRM Software Selections
Selecting a new enterprise customer relationship management (CRM) solution is an undertaking that requires careful planning and managed execution. And in fact

assessment guide for business crm software  Software Selection Features | Assessment Software Selection | Consumer Software Selection | Standard Software Selection | Software Selection Tips | Simulation Software Selection | Software Selection Reference | Symbolic Software Selection | CRM Software Selection | CRM Software Selection Process | CRM Software Selecton Methodology | CRM Successful Software Selection | CRM Responsible Software Selection | CRM Business Software Selection | CRM Software Selection Guide | CRM Software Selection Tool | CRM

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

CRM for Financial and Insurance Markets

Customer relationship management (CRM) focuses on the retention of customers by collecting data from all customer interactions with a company from all access points (by phone, mail, or Web, or in the field). The company can then use this data for specific business purposes by taking a customer-centric rather than a product-centric approach. CRM applications are front-end tools designed to facilitate the capture, consolidation, analysis, and enterprise-wide dissemination of data from existing and potential customers. This process occurs throughout the marketing, sales, and service stages, with the objective of better understanding one’s customers and anticipating their interest in an enterprise’s products or services.  

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SaaS Buyer's Guide for Wholesale and Distribution


SaaS, despite its phenomenal popularity, is certainly not one-size-fits-all. You need to consider decision criteria such as fit, return on investment, and risk. Learn how SaaS works, who the major vendors are, how SaaS can help your business grow, and how to find the SaaS solution that’s right for you. It’s all in this comprehensive SaaS Buyer’s Guide for Wholesale and Distribution from TEC and SupplyChainBrain.

From a business requirements perspective, the defining characteristic of wholesale and distribution (W&D) organizations is that they operate as intermediate agents between manufacturers and retailers. Their top business needs thus focus on requirements for:

  • processing high volumes of transactions,
  • maintaining constant communication between upstream and downstream collaborators (manufacturers and retailers/customers, respectively), and
  • managing products for multiple competitors within the same warehouse or distribution center

In this guide we will explore considerations for W&D organizations that are considering adoption of the SaaS delivery model, and examine the particular business issues that arise from this change.Specifically, we will address the following considerations:

  • the differences between SaaS and on-premise delivery models
  • SaaS architectures
  • SaaS pros, cons, and other considerations
  • selection criteria for SaaS-based applications
  • viable wholesale and distribution SaaS vendors

Later in this guide, we’ll provide examples of SaaS delivery model success stories, as well as a SaaS IT directory, segmented according to business area.


Table of Contents


Preface

Software as a Service: A Buyer’s Guide


Spotlight on Adaptability and Agility

Thought Leadership from SAP
SAP’s Perspective on Software as a Service

SAP Case Study
Johnson Products Capitalizing on New Sales after 30-day SAP Deployment


Spotlight on Manufacturing and Distribution

Thought Leadership from Epicor
SaaS ERP for Small Manufacturers and Distributors

TECSYS Case Study
LifeScience Logistics Achieves 99.97% Inventory Accuracy with TECYS’ EliteSeries for Healthcare


Spotlight on Growing Your Company with SaaS

Thought Leadership from NetSuite
The Benefits of a Business Management Software Suite for High-growth and Midsized Businesses: Overcoming the Barriers of Stand-alone Business Applications

NetSuite Case Study
Woodworking Machinery Maker Cuts Costs, Grows Efficiency with NetSuite

NetSuite Case Study
NetSuite Helps Manufacturer Take Advantage of Fast Market Growth


Spotlight on Distribution Centers

Thought Leadership from Bond International Software
Cloud Computing for Your Distribution Workforce

IBS Case Study
Konaflex Focuses on its Core Business with IBS Distribution Management Software


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.



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What Are the Differences between the SaaS and On-premise Delivery Models?



Defining the on-premise delivery model is relatively straightforward:

  • The software is acquired by the customer up-front.
  • The software is installed, deployed, managed, and maintained at the customer’s site, generally with a great degree of involvement by the customer.
  • The customer provides the in-house infrastructure (e.g., servers, hardware, networks) to support the software.


Defining the SaaS model is slightly more complex, since different SaaS vendors offer different definitions. We’ll explore these variations in more detail shortly, but for now we’ll note the following SaaS characteristics:

  • The software vendor provides customers with access to the software via the Internet.
  • The customer pays for this service on a subscription basis (normally per user, per month, or per number of transactions).
  • The vendor is responsible for maintenance, upgrades, and software support, as well as the supporting infrastructure.

The major difference between the on-premise and SaaS delivery model lies in the ownership of the software. In the on-premise model, once the software is purchased, the customer owns it. In the SaaS delivery model, the software is not owned by the customer: it is provided to the customer in the same manner as any other service.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.

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CRM Success for Fast Growing Companies: What Every Small and Midsized Business Needs to Know


When creating a seamless value chain, it is essential to focus on the customer. However, information, data, and processes are key when planning the complex merger of processes, technologies, and culture. Additionally, a successful value chain recognizes that partners, vendors, suppliers, and employees play a vital role to ensure that customer values are both recognized and realized.

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Medical Device Manufacturers Can Leverage ERP/CRM Software to Facilitate FDA Compliance


The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires pharmaceuticals and medical device companies to comply with numerous standards. Medical device manufacturers have long embraced enterprise resource planning (ERP) and customer relationship management (CRM), but primarily use them to achieve operational efficiencies. However these systems can play a significant role in their abilities to comply with strictly FDA regulations.

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Your Guide to Enterprise Software Selection: Part One


Enterprise software selection is a risky undertaking for any organization. Find out how you can reduce the risk with a best-practice approach to assessment, evaluation, and selection—and learn how to reduce the time and cost involved in choosing the right solution.

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Everest Software Inc.


Founded in 1994, Everest Software is a privately-held, multinational software company headquartered in Dulles, Virginia (US). Everest Software has nearly 300 employees. The company has developed Everest, a business management solution for small and mid-size businesses in the wholesale, distribution, retail, and e-commerce industries. Over 3,000 small business in 49 countries use Everest, which was the winner of the 2004 SIIA Codie Award for Best Business Software Product. In 2009, Everest was acquired by Versata Enterprises. Versata revitalizes best-of-breed companies for the sake of customer success, often extending and evolving products for the long term. The current reach of Versata’s companies is broad and the family grows each year through the acquisition of additional leading solution providers.

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Sonata Software


Sonata Software is a technology services company, with an on-site/offshore service delivery model. Sonata's philosophy is to invest organizational resources into new relationships through its pilot program and to grow the pilot relationship into a full-fledged virtual development center for the client.

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Frontier Software Ltd


Frontier Software is a human resource (HR) and payroll software vendor. It provides solutions to tier one, two, and three companies with a variation of active server pages (ASP), inhouse, and outsourced services. Frontier Software, founded in 1993, has offices on three continents and headquarters in Melbourne, Victoria (Australia). The company has installations in twelve countries and a licensed user base of over 1,300 clients.

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Mobile Business Intelligence (BI)-The Importance of On-the-Move Business Clarity and Agility


Today’s employees expect to have access to business data in a single mobile device with intuitive tools to quickly perform tasks. If enterprises wish to provide BI to every end user, they need a BI solution that is flexible, scalable, and practical enough to function on all smartphones and tablet computing devices with all the features and functionality needed to manage the business at strategic, operational, and tactical levels.

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Enterprise CRM Platform (ECP)


ECP is a platform of role-specific CRM productivity tools for insurance and financial service professionals, providing complete product line capabilities in a comprehensive, industry-specific solution.  

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IBM Cognos Business Intelligence: Business Intelligence (BI) Competitor Analysis Report


This business intelligence (BI) knowledge base covers a full range of BI functionality. BI applications enable real time, interactive access, analysis, and manipulation of mission-critical corporate information. BI users are able to access and leverage vast amounts of information to analyze relationships and understand trends that support business decisions. This knowledge base covers everything from data mining to analytics, querying, reporting, workflow, and in-depth analysis.

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