Executive Resources

Digital Signage in the Cloud

Source: Omnivex Corporation
With the growing popularity of the cloud, the concept of software as a service (SaaS)–based digital signage platforms has been gaining traction, depending on the nature of the business and the degree of control needed over the data. This paper covers the fundamentals of cloud computing and on-premise hosting models to help users determine the type of digital signage deployment best suited to their business needs.



Related content:

The Wizards Behind Google Apps: Advice for Admins From Admins

Your organization’s IT staff is crucial to the successful implementation and maintenance of Google Apps. In this white paper, learn how to help your IT department get ready for the move to Google Apps and hear from a variety of IT specialists that have already been through the transition process. Read first-hand accounts from IT experts about the collaborative and financial benefits of switching to Google Apps’ cloud services, the ease of the data migration process, and how to use Google Apps Directory Synch (GAPS) to configure and synchronize accounts. Learn details on how to protect your data with the use of Google Vault and other third-party services to monitor data storage and further secure your information. An overview of mobile device management is also provided.

No transition is problem-free, so this Google Apps guide offers a comprehensive list of other helpful resources for reference, if any issues present themselves during transition and training. Ten time-saving tips for setting up efficiently are also included. Google Apps recommends starting by slowly introducing Gmail and Drive across your organization, adding and expanding Google Apps tools with the success of this base introduction. Learn how your IT department will save time as cloud-based software improves rapidly, adding and improving features on a monthly basis with little interruption to your organization. Following the guidelines in this white paper, you’ll ensure the smoothest possible transition to Google Apps.

The C-Suite's Guide to Moving to Google Apps

Google Apps can help improve your business, but it’s important for the C-Suite to prepare for the switch by developing an implementation strategy before the actual switch to Google Apps occurs.

This white paper provides answers for the common questions that may arise before you make the change to Google Apps, and addresses specific areas of concern that each member of the C-Suite might have before and during the system changeover. Learn how to deal with potential issues such as access and security controls, recurring costs, how software as a service (SaaS) functions, and how browser-based access will allow for easier telecommuting. Read in depth about how Google Apps will help your organization with compliance, archiving, document management, and what updates for data sharing and terms of service operations really mean for your business.

Each of the CIO, CFO, CLO, and COO members of the C-Suite may have their own concerns, specific to their areas of expertise. These are addressed as well. Potential and projected overall benefits to each member of the C-Suite as a result of Google Apps implementation are also highlighted. Read this Google Apps white paper as the first step to facilitating a smooth transition. With the development of a strategy across the C-Suite, you’ll maximize the benefits of Google Apps for your entire organization.

The Guide to Google Apps Training Part Five: Organizational Units and Permissions

It’s a given that the level of access to information is determined by the roles people have within your company or organization. Having the right tools to establish perimeters and authorizations is key for a good security base.

Once you’re using Google Apps, providing essential tools for the management of these varying levels of access and assigning “admin roles” is easily accomplished by following the steps outlined in this white paper. With the help of this Google Apps guide, your super administrator can develop and establish organizational units, assign and organize admin roles, as well as configure member access to settings and services. Learn how to best develop and configure service and setting details, and how to easily create administrative privileges with a series of pre-built roles. While the five pre-built roles supplied by Google Apps (help desk admin, groups admin, user management admin, services admin, and reseller admin) are generally adequate for use, more customization may be needed. Help for assignation and/or creation of these roles by the super administrator is also explained. This Google Apps guide also gives information on providing additional management services for Chrome devices, which can be adapted by the user to your departmental requirements, and discusses how Google Apps Directory Synch (GADS) helps to organize users.

The Guide to Google Apps Training Part Four: Advanced Security Configuration and Compliance

Google offers protection of your information with its sophisticated data and encryption centers. But now that you’ve become comfortable with the tools and basic security settings for Google Apps, you can get more in-depth and establish other security settings on your own. This next level of control allows you to review the settings for the core of Google Apps and gives you even better protection over your data with the ability to configure security parameters for associated apps.

In this Google Apps Guide, get detailed information about commonly asked questions regarding Google security topics. Learn how to set levels of calendar sharing internally and externally, how to configure and restrict collaboration capabilities of Google Docs on- and off-line, and how to execute configurations of Gmail access for mobile device management and compliance for even more protection. A step-by-step process is provided for the creation and facilitation of groups, as well as granting or revoking a user’s individual permissions for security access to third-party apps. Review, enable (or disable), and configure a series of core Google Services, including: Chrome management, Google+, Google Vault, and Google Apps Marketplace. The Google Apps Guide also describes how to enable or disable some non-core extra Google Apps.

The Guide to Google Apps Training: Part Two: How to Secure a Google Apps Domain

You don’t have control over attempted attacks on your domain, but putting the right security systems in place means you can block access to your data and your domain. Google Apps provides users with a wide variety of customizable options to ensure that a domain is secure. Google Apps features stringent user access controls, governing how and when selected users gain access to the domain, and a disaster recovery system in order to retrieve any data compromised due to a security breach.

In this white paper, learn the basic systems and settings for a variety of security features, including development of domain recovery options, enforcement of secure sockets layer (SSL) connections, how to configure two-factor authorization for maximum mobile security, and the importance of auditing and setting long minimums for passwords. You’ll also read how the Google Apps system works to create the best mobile security for your domain, and how installation of a Google Apps Device Policy can further protect your domain in case of device theft. Get information on the disaster recovery features included in the core Google Apps, and how third-party systems such as Backupify can be added to further strengthen data recovery options, ensuring that duplicate copies of documents are available. Through these controls, users can be assured that their domain data is secure.