Executive Resources

Hanging on the Telephone: Antivirus Cold-calling Support Scams

Source: Eset
Service support scammers rely on the naiveté of their victims in order to persuade them to grant access to their computers and credit card details. There’s very little a security company can do directly to prevent this activity, apart from keeping its own software up to date so as to detect malware and block as many threats as possible. Read this white paper to find out about different types of scams that threaten your data security.



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Enterprise Plans for Mobile Security

Mobile devices can be essential for information-sharing and networking within enterprises. With them comes the question of security and access management. The approach a company takes to selecting mobile security must look at some key factors, including capabilities for application management and whether the device is employee-owned or company-owned. This report was put together following a survey of IT buying decision-makers at 108 medium and large enterprises. It looks at strategies for setting up effective mobile device security.

Moving Beyond Your Mobile Blind Spot: An App Centric Approach to Enterprise Mobility

Between 55% and 65% of enterprises allow some type of bring your own device (BYOD), according to J. Gold and Associates’ research. While companies tend to have mobile strategies, there are often gaps within those strategies that overlook factors like changing technology requirements and security breaches. This report looks at the crucial factor of security, compares mobile security solutions, and details prioritizing the user experience.

The Guide to Google Apps Training Part Five: Organizational Units and Permissions

It’s a given that the level of access to information is determined by the roles people have within your company or organization. Having the right tools to establish perimeters and authorizations is key for a good security base.

Once you’re using Google Apps, providing essential tools for the management of these varying levels of access and assigning “admin roles” is easily accomplished by following the steps outlined in this white paper. With the help of this Google Apps guide, your super administrator can develop and establish organizational units, assign and organize admin roles, as well as configure member access to settings and services. Learn how to best develop and configure service and setting details, and how to easily create administrative privileges with a series of pre-built roles. While the five pre-built roles supplied by Google Apps (help desk admin, groups admin, user management admin, services admin, and reseller admin) are generally adequate for use, more customization may be needed. Help for assignation and/or creation of these roles by the super administrator is also explained. This Google Apps guide also gives information on providing additional management services for Chrome devices, which can be adapted by the user to your departmental requirements, and discusses how Google Apps Directory Synch (GADS) helps to organize users.

The Guide to Google Apps Training Part Four: Advanced Security Configuration and Compliance

Google offers protection of your information with its sophisticated data and encryption centers. But now that you’ve become comfortable with the tools and basic security settings for Google Apps, you can get more in-depth and establish other security settings on your own. This next level of control allows you to review the settings for the core of Google Apps and gives you even better protection over your data with the ability to configure security parameters for associated apps.

In this Google Apps Guide, get detailed information about commonly asked questions regarding Google security topics. Learn how to set levels of calendar sharing internally and externally, how to configure and restrict collaboration capabilities of Google Docs on- and off-line, and how to execute configurations of Gmail access for mobile device management and compliance for even more protection. A step-by-step process is provided for the creation and facilitation of groups, as well as granting or revoking a user’s individual permissions for security access to third-party apps. Review, enable (or disable), and configure a series of core Google Services, including: Chrome management, Google+, Google Vault, and Google Apps Marketplace. The Google Apps Guide also describes how to enable or disable some non-core extra Google Apps.

The Guide to Google Apps Training: Part Two: How to Secure a Google Apps Domain

You don’t have control over attempted attacks on your domain, but putting the right security systems in place means you can block access to your data and your domain. Google Apps provides users with a wide variety of customizable options to ensure that a domain is secure. Google Apps features stringent user access controls, governing how and when selected users gain access to the domain, and a disaster recovery system in order to retrieve any data compromised due to a security breach.

In this white paper, learn the basic systems and settings for a variety of security features, including development of domain recovery options, enforcement of secure sockets layer (SSL) connections, how to configure two-factor authorization for maximum mobile security, and the importance of auditing and setting long minimums for passwords. You’ll also read how the Google Apps system works to create the best mobile security for your domain, and how installation of a Google Apps Device Policy can further protect your domain in case of device theft. Get information on the disaster recovery features included in the core Google Apps, and how third-party systems such as Backupify can be added to further strengthen data recovery options, ensuring that duplicate copies of documents are available. Through these controls, users can be assured that their domain data is secure.